Vitamin K-Rich Foods To Include In Your Daily Diet

vitamin K-rich foods

If you’re like most people, you probably think of vitamin K as something that is only important for blood clotting. However, this essential vitamin has a host of other health benefits, including reducing the risk of heart disease and cancer. Luckily, there is plenty of vitamin K-rich foods that you can easily include in your daily diet. Check out this list to get started!

Why Vitamin K – The Science

Vitamin K is a fat-soluble vitamin that is mainly found in leafy green vegetables. This vitamin is important for many functions in the body, including blood clotting, bone health, and heart health. Vitamin K gets its name from the German word “coagulation,” which means “coagulation.” Vitamin K1, also known as phylloquinone, is found in plants. Vitamin K2, also known as menaquinone, is found in animal products and fermented foods. Vitamin K3, also known as menadione, is a synthetic form of vitamin K that is not recommended for human consumption. Most people get enough vitamin K from their diet. However, some groups of people may be at risk for vitamin K deficiency, including those who have certain medical conditions, take certain medications, or eat a very restrictive diet. Vitamin K deficiency can lead to problems with blood clotting and bone health.

Vitamin K-Rich Foods

1. Spinach:

One cup of cooked spinach contains over 1000% of the daily recommended intake (DRI) of vitamin K. This leafy green is also a good source of vitamins A and C, iron, and calcium.

2. Swiss Chard:

One cup of cooked Swiss chard contains over 900% of the DRI for vitamin K. This leafy green is also high in vitamins A and C, as well as magnesium and potassium.

3. Collards:

One cup of cooked collards contains over 800% of the DRI for vitamin K. This leafy green is also a good source of vitamins A and C, calcium, and manganese.

4. kale:

One cup of cooked kale contains over 700% of the DRI for vitamin K. This leafy green is also high in vitamins A and C, as well as iron, calcium, and potassium.

5. Mustard Greens:

One cup of cooked mustard greens contains over 600% of the DRI for vitamin K. This leafy green is also a good source of vitamins A and C, manganese, and folate.

6. Turnip Greens:

One cup of cooked turnip greens contains over 500% of the DRI for vitamin K. This leafy green is also a good source of vitamins A and C, calcium, and manganese.

7. Broccoli:

One cup of cooked broccoli contains over 200% of the DRI for vitamin K. This cruciferous vegetable is also a good source of vitamins C and A, as well as fiber and potassium.

8. Brussels Sprouts:

One cup of cooked Brussels sprouts contains over 200% of the DRI for vitamin K. This cruciferous vegetable is also a good source of vitamins C and A, as well as fiber and manganese.

9. Cauliflower:

One cup of cooked cauliflower contains over 100% of the DRI for vitamin K. This cruciferous vegetable is also a good source of vitamins C and B6, as well as fiber and potassium.

10. Garlic:

One clove of garlic contains over 100% of the DRI for vitamin K. This flavorful herb is also a good source of manganese and vitamins B6 and C.

11. Egg Yolks:

One large egg yolk contains over 100% of the DRI for vitamin K. Egg yolks are also a good source of choline, selenium, and vitamins A, D, and B12.

12. Liver:

Three ounces of cooked liver contains over 100% of the DRI for vitamin K. Liver is also a good source of copper, iron, niacin, and vitamin B12.

13. Salmon:

Three ounces of cooked salmon contains over 100% of the DRI for vitamin K. Salmon is also a good source of protein, omega-3 fatty acids, and vitamins B6 and B12.

14. Cabbage:

One cup of cooked cabbage contains over 50% of the DRI for vitamin K. Cabbage is also a good source of fiber, Vitamin C, and manganese.

15. Green Beans:

One cup of cooked green beans contains over 50% of the DRI for vitamin K. Green beans are also a good source of fiber, Vitamin C, and manganese.

16. Parsley:

One ounce of fresh parsley contains over 50% of the DRI for vitamin K. Parsley is also a good source of Vitamin C and iron.

17. Winter Squash:

One cup of cooked winter squash contains over 50% of the DRI for vitamin K. Winter squash is also a good source of fiber, Vitamin A, and potassium.

18. Asparagus:

One cup of cooked asparagus contains over 40% of the DRI for vitamin K. Asparagus is also a good source of fiber, Vitamin C, and folate.

19. Avocados:

One cup of avocado slices contains over 30% of the DRI for vitamin K. Avocados are also a good source of healthy fats, Vitamin C, and potassium.

20. Green Peas:

One cup of cooked green peas contains over 30% of the DRI for vitamin K. Green peas are also a good source of fiber, Vitamin C, and manganese.

21. Strawberries:

One cup of fresh strawberries contains over 30% of the DRI for vitamin K. Strawberries are also a good source of Vitamin C and manganese.

22. Corn:

One cup of cooked corn contains over 20% of the DRI for vitamin K. Corn is also a good source of fiber, Vitamin C, and thiamin.

23. Blueberries:

One cup of fresh blueberries contains over 20% of the DRI for vitamin K. Blueberries are also a good source of Vitamin C and fiber.

24. Carrots:

One cup of cooked carrots contains over 10% of the DRI for vitamin K. Carrots are also a good source of Vitamin A, Vitamin B6, and potassium.

25. Peppers:

One cup of sweet bell peppers contains over 10% of the DRI for vitamin K. Peppers are also a good source of Vitamin C and manganese.

Adding just a few of these foods to your diet each day can help ensure that you’re getting enough vitamin K. including them as part of a healthy, balanced diet can help support overall health and wellness.

What does vitamin K do?

Vitamin K is a nutrient that helps your blood clot. It’s also important for bone health. Vitamin K can be found in leafy green vegetables, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, and other fruits and vegetables. Vitamin K is also found in liver, eggs, and dairy products.

How much vitamin K do you need?

The recommended daily intake (RDI) for vitamin K is:

– Adults: 90 micrograms/day

– Children: 75-120 micrograms/day depending on age

Pregnant and breastfeeding women need more vitamin K. The RDI for pregnant women is 90 micrograms/day. The RDI for breastfeeding women is 120 micrograms/day.

Vitamin K is a fat-soluble vitamin. This means that it’s stored in your body’s fat tissue. Vitamin K doesn’t build up in your body the way some other vitamins do, so you need a regular supply of it from your diet.

If you don’t get enough vitamin K, you may be at risk for bleeding disorders or bone problems. Vitamin K deficiency is rare in healthy people who eat a varied diet. Vitamin K supplements are available if you’re at risk for deficiency or if you have certain health conditions that make it hard to absorb vitamin K from food.

Vitamin K is safe for most people when taken in recommended amounts. Vitamin K can interact with some medications, so be sure to talk to your doctor about your vitamin K intake if you take any medications.

Q: What are the risks of taking vitamin K supplements?

A: Vitamin K is safe for most people when taken in recommended amounts. Vitamin K can interact with some medications, so be sure to talk to your doctor about your vitamin K intake if you take any medications.

 

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